Startups are betting that letting people work from home, an RV, or a New Zealand mountaintop will lure top talent away from Silicon Valley


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Tech companies are increasingly adopting all-remote workforces.
A few years ago, investors were hesistant about startups that don’t even have a office — but the success of all-remote companies like Zapier and GitLab, as well as the increasing availability of chat tools like Slack and Zoom, have given them confidence.
Startups are fighting with Silicon Valley tech giants for the best talent, so hiring remotely can be a way to attract better talent who live in other parts of the globe.
Startups can also cut costs by not having to pay for office space and by hiring outside of the expensive Bay Area.
An all-remote culture carries its own drawbacks. For example, should everybody be paid the same amount, if they live in areas with different costs of living?

On New Year’s Day, David Biggar — a support manager at anti-malware company Emsisoft — moved into a fixer-upper RV with his wife.

He’s planning to leave his home in Caldwell, Idaho behind him. Biggar isn’t sure where he and his wife want to grow old together, so they’re going to hit the road and find out — somewhere warmer, perhaps, in the south, or on the coast.

He’s not leaving his job behind, though. In fact, Biggar will keep working from wherever he can find WiFi — a luxury he’s afforded because his whole companies works remotely, from wherever in the world they happen to be.

Emsisoft is just one of a growing number of all-remote tech companies, including well-known startups like GitLab and Zapier.

This kind of arrangement is attractive to both employers and employees: Salaries in Silicon Valley might be sky-high, but so too is the cost of living. By hiring remotely, employers can find the best talent, wherever they are in the world, while also saving on both salaries and office space. And for their part, employees like Biggar get to work from wherever they want.

“The funnest, neatest thing is being able to up and go, as long as it doesn’t impact work performance,” Biggar told Business Insider. “Having the flexibility is amazing, instead of being tied down to an office or a schedule.”

In 2017, 5.2 percent of U.S. workers employees worked from home, according to the last census. As it becomes more socially acceptable in America to work from home, it’s similarly encouraged startups to choose the all-remote path.

“People are just getting to used it,” Adam Ozimek, senior economist at Moody’s Analytics, told Business Insider. “Technologically, it’s been possible for a while. It takes a slow cultural change to allow people to work from home.”

Indeed, towards all-remote companies are changing. Megan Quinn, general partner at Spark Capital, says that just five years ago, most investors would balk at putting money into an all-remote startup. Now, it’s seen as less of a factor — Quinn herself led Spark’s investment in design platform InVision, which is all-remote.

“The thinking was you had to have everyone in the same four walls,” Quinn told Business Insider. “That’s changed …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

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